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  • Posted on: 3/13/2014

     

    At 24 Hour Data, we know that small businesses and large organizations, alike, use databases for nearly every aspect of operations, from customer relationship management to sales and marketing and more. So when your database fails, you risk losing mission critical data that can cost your company important business… or even cost your entire business.

    If you are facing missing or corrupt data in your database or you can’t access your database at all, there are typically three common causes. Let’s look at each one and then determine the best steps to take to recover your lost data.

    Database Hardware Failure
    A database is just a combination of software and data. Frequently, when a database fails to boot, it’s due to hardware failure. The RAID array, server or hard drive has failed, resulting in the inability to access the database. If your database is stored on a RAID array and only one drive in the array has failed, it may be possible for IT professionals to perform a hot swap and replace the failed drive in a RAID 1 configuration or higher.

    If your database is stored on a virtual server, you may be able to restore the server to the time of the last snapshot. If only a small amount of time has passed and your database is not updated frequently, you may be able to recover your lost data.

    In many cases, however, hard drive or RAID failure requires a professional data recovery service to restore lost data without the risk of losing that data forever. If you’re in doubt, call data recovery pros to provide a free price quote with no obligation.

    File Corruption
    Databases may fail at the file level, which means one or more files in the database have become damaged, causing corruption. Corrupted files represent logical damage to the database and hard drive. However, do-it-yourself data recovery may overwrite the data and result in permanent data loss. If you don’t have experience in dealing with data recovery, it’s best to call an expert. Prices for logical data recovery may be lower than you expect, and you could get your data back in less than 24 hours.

    File System Damage
    Sometimes, operating system files will become damaged or corrupted if a server or computer is powered down incorrectly, experiences a power surge, or something happens to interrupt the process while data is being written to the files.

    Since databases are complex systems that are updated frequently, if a damaged OS file corrupts a database directory, it can be difficult to delete and reinstall the OS without permanently losing data from the database.

    Call the Experts for Database Recovery
    If you’re not an expert in logical data recovery, it’s best to call experts for help.
    24 Hour Data has years of experience recovering databases running on a variety of systems, including Microsoft Exchange, SQL, MySQL, Oracle, SharePoint, Filemaker and more. 

     

  • Posted on: 3/06/2014

    Cloud Backups

     

    Do you know the number one reason for data loss in cloud storage environments? You might be surprised.

    It’s not a data breach or attack directed at the service provider. It’s not a  natural disaster.

    It’s simple human error.

    According to the Aberdeen Group’s report, “SaaS Data Loss: The Problem You Didn’t Know You Had,” (http://www.aberdeen.com/Aberdeen-Library/8323/AI-cloud-data-loss.aspx) more than one-third of the companies polled have lost data stored in the cloud. Nearly 65 percent of these losses were caused by user error. In 47% of the cases, users deleted the information, and 17% of the time, the information was accidentally overwritten.

    Only 13% of instances of data loss were caused by hackers deleting information.

    Cloud-based storage is handy for file-sharing without taxing the resources of your server, and makes it easy for today’s mobile workforce to work any time, from anywhere. And, user error aside, it’s largely a safe and secure method of data storage. 

    Keeping in mind that well over half of all instances of data loss are caused by end users – your employees, and your colleagues who may have access to your data in the cloud, and possibly even yourself – how can you protect your cloud-based data? Here are some tips.

    1. Train employees on new applications. – We can’t overemphasize the importance of training. Most cloud-based storage programs are user-friendly and intuitive. Spending a few minutes training employees now can save hours of headaches, lost revenue, and even data recovery costs, later.

    Encourage employees to ask questions if they’re not sure how to save, retrieve, upload or download files.

    2. Adhere to file naming conventions. – Setting company standards and protocols for file names and folders can save lots of time when it comes to looking for files and can prevent accidental overwriting of mission critical files. Include this information during training, and provide a handy reference sheet as a reminder.

    3. Limit access. – Limit access to cloud storage on an “as-needed” basis and change passwords frequently. Additionally, since most cloud storage is affordable, you can use different programs for different needs and limit access to each program.

    4. Adhere to password best practices. – Passwords should be a combination of numbers, letters and special characters and should not be an identifiable word in the English language. Change passwords frequently, including whenever an employee leaves the company.

    With a few precautions, you can avoid many of the causes of data loss in the cloud. 

  • Posted on: 2/27/2014

     

    As the amount of mission critical data required by small businesses grows, data loss becomes inevitable. Let’s take a look at some significant 2013 statistics on data loss, researched by a number of reputable organizations and reported by data backup service provider Essentialink. https://essentialink.com/business-continuity-statistics-industry-trends-...


    Data Loss Statistics
    A Gartner survey said that 25% of PCs will fail this year. In many cases, when a hard drive fails, backups are not in place and data will be lost.

    A Forrester survey revealed that 24% of companies polled said they experienced a full data disaster, meaning the loss of mission critical business data.

    Finally, 95% of companies experienced a data outage in 2013, according to the Ponemon Institute.

    If we are to take away anything from these numbers, it’s that failure of your IT systems is nearly inevitable – it’s not a question of “if,” it’s a question of “when.” 

    Reducing Data Loss with a Business Continuity Plan
    However, you can reduce the consequences of data loss, including the loss of revenue, with a business continuity plan that includes the proper resources for data recovery.

    Employees should be instructed to contact IT staff immediately if their local hard drive fails to boot or begins whirring or grinding. Under no circumstances should an employee attempt do it yourself back-up or try to read data from a hard drive that is not operating properly.

    If an employee receives an error message upon trying to access the server or virtual server, they should contact IT staff immediately. In most cases when a hard disk drive fails, professional data recovery is required. You may be dealing with physical failure of the hard drive, and repeated attempts to restore data or reboot the drive can result in complete data loss.

    Similarly, IT staff should be attuned to notice any signs of impending RAID failure in the servers or virtual servers and know the steps to take if this occurs.

    Restoring a Virtual Server
    If the IT staff has taken regular snapshots of the virtual server, it’s an easy process for IT staff to restore the virtual server to the time of the last snapshot. However, there is often a few hours between the time of data loss and the last server snapshot. This is where a professional data recovery firm comes in.

    If, for some reason, you can’t access the snapshot, you need professional data recovery.

    Reduce Downtime by Calling 24 Hour Data
    The sooner you call a professional data recovery service, the sooner we can restore your lost data, rebuild your virtual server, and get your business running again.

    We know how a virtual server crash can cripple a business. That’s why 24 Hour Data offers 24-hour service and the fastest data recovery in the industry. 

  • Posted on: 2/18/2014

    RAID Recovery

    Restoring a failed RAID array often requires expert help from a professional data recovery service. It’s important to remember that one when hard drive in a RAID array fails, it puts added strain on the other drives in the array and can lead to cascading RAID failure and catastrophic data loss.

    However, many levels of RAID use built-in redundancy, which makes RAID storage one of the preferred forms of data storage for enterprise-level data storage within small-to-mid-size businesses. RAID 1 and RAID 5 configurations can withstand the failure of one drive before professional data recovery is required.

    RAID 6, which is rapidly becoming the RAID configuration of choice for enterprise-level data storage, can tolerate the failure of two drives before data loss. We talk about other common benefits of RAID 6 arrays in this post: http://www.24hourdata.com/blog/storage-benefits-raid-6-array.

    Steps to Take When a RAID Drive Fails
    When a drive fails but the RAID is still functioning, the first step is to back-up all data to another storage device immediately. When one drive fails, it puts strains on the other drives in the array and can often lead to cascading RAID failure.

    Performing a Hot Swap in a RAID Array
    An experienced IT professional can replace a failed drive by doing a “hot swap.” The missing data can then be re-written on the newly replaced drive. Keep in mind, all drives in a RAID array are typically the same age, and when one fails, the others may soon follow. After completing a hot swap, and with backups in place, it’s a good idea to replace your entire RAID array. 

    A hot swap is not an easy operation and should only be performed by an IT professional with the proper training. To avoid cascading failure, you can call 24 Hour Data and we can replace the drives in your RAID array and rebuild the array if a hard drive has failed.

    When More Than One Disk Fails
    When a drive in a RAID array fails, other drives often follow, sometimes before you can back up all the data. When this occurs, you’re facing data loss. Do not attempt do it yourself data recovery, as this can render data unrecoverable.

    Call 24 Hour Data with the make and model of your RAID controller and the failed drives. We will provide you with a fair and honest price quote and begin the data recovery process immediately, so you can get back to business faster. 

  • Posted on: 2/13/2014

    Hard Drive Recovery

     

    If hard disk drives never died, there’d be very little reason for emergency data recovery.  Of course, there will always be user error, accidental deletion, natural disasters and file corruption caused by viruses and malware. But the second leading cause of data loss, failed hard disk drives, wouldn’t matter. However, even with new SSL and hybrid hard disks, there is one other “constant” in life besides death and taxes: hard drive failure.

    But how soon will most hard disk drives fail?

    Many manufacturers offer a one-year warranty against defects on their hard disk drives, which may lead you to believe that most drives will last approximately 13 months or a little longer. Enterprise class hard drives, usually warranted five years, should outlast consumer hard drives by quite a bit.

    According to extensive research completed by online data storage firm, Backblaze, (http://www.extremetech.com/computing/170748-how-long-do-hard-drives-actually-live-for) most hard disk drives will last a bit longer than that.

    After four years of testing, Backblaze discovered that 90% of consumer drives last more than three years. 80% of the drives tested lasted as long as four years. After three years, the moving parts begin to wear down and catastrophic failure and data loss can occur at any time.

    The moral? Data backups are important at any time, but after three-to-four years of use, you should expect your hard disk drive to fail at any time. Backups become critical, and it’s also important to know what to do in a data recovery emergency, which includes powering down your computer immediately and calling a data recovery service right away for the best odds that you’ll be able to get your data back.

    “Infant Mortality” in Hard Disk Drives
    Backblaze’s research discovered something else that should serve as a warning to hard drive users. In testing, 5.1% of the drives didn’t make it to their 18-month anniversary. This was due to a defect in the drive, usually covered by the warranty.

    If your drive makes it to this 18-month mark, the odds that it will survive the next year-and-a-half rise to more than 98%. At three years, the drive parts start wearing down and we reach the phase when hard disk failure can occur at any time.

    Old drive or new, the lesson is clear. Back up your data and know who to call in a data recovery emergency. 

  • Posted on: 2/05/2014

    Hard Disk Failure

     

    Backblaze, an unlimited online backup company, recently published the results of an extensive, four-year study of hard disk drive lifespans. In additional to revealing some useful and interesting statistics on hard drive lifespans, the study also uncovered three common reasons for hard disk drive failure.

    Since 24 Hour Data specializes in recovering lost data after hard disk failure, let’s look at some of the most common reasons people call us.

    Hard disk failure reason #1: Manufacturer’s defects – Some hard drives just weren’t built to last. According to the Backblaze study, 5.1% of all drives die within 18 months of use. These failures are usually covered by warranty and are typically due to manufacturer’s defects. A small percentage, 2.5%, of all drives die before their first birthday.

    Hard disk failure reason #2: Random failure – Sometimes, a drive fails for no apparent reason after 18 months. Fortunately, this doesn’t happen often, occurring only 1.8% of the time in the Backblaze study. This number doesn’t account for hard disk failure from outside factors, such as file corruption, viruses, shock damage, heat damage or natural disasters.

    Hard disk failure reason #3: End-of-life – As the mechanical parts in a hard disk drive wear down due to normal use, mechanical failure becomes nearly inevitable. This occurs when the drive is anywhere from three to six years old, although some fortunate users may get even more time out of their hard disk drives.

    If your drive is nearing its end of life, daily back-ups are important. If your older drive begins making clicking or whirring sounds, back up your files and power down your computer. It may not be too late to save your data and replace your drive. Be aware that your drive may fail during the back-up process, and you’ll need emergency data recovery to extract your lost data before further damage occurs.

    Understanding  the life spans of hard disk drives can help you be more prepared for hard disk failure and potentially avoid a data recovery emergency. 

  • Posted on: 1/30/2014

    Backup Recovery

     

    By now, most computer users know that it’s important to back up your data frequently. But knowing what you should do and executing the action plan to get it done are, unfortunately, two different things. Where should you start when it comes to backing up your data? Fortunately, as with most things related to technology today, you have options. 

    24 Hour Data explores popular options for data backup. We hope you’ll pick one or more of these methods to save yourself from a data recovery emergency. But remember that we’re always here to help. Whether your back-ups have failed, or it’s been weeks or just hours since your last back-up, we can help you recover mission critical data and valuable family files quickly and affordably.

    Data Back Up Method 1: External Hard Disk Drive
    With affordable hard disk drives available in sizes from 1TB to 8TB and up at affordable prices, and easy connectivity through USB2 or Firewire, there’s no reason not to back up your data on an external hard drive from a data storage manufacturer like Seagate or Western Digital.

    Benefits: Easy to use, affordable, sturdy, large (to hold all your data in one location), can be encrypted for data security.
    Drawbacks: For home users, external drives are likely to be stored in the same location as the computer or server, which means that if a fire, flood or natural disaster affects your machine, your backups may be lost, too. Hard disk drives are also susceptible to shock damage if dropped. For business users considering long term data storage, hard disk drives may deteriorate without regular use.

    Data Back Up Method 2: USB Flash Drives
    USB flash drives are ubiquitous in the world of technology. They can serve as adequate back-ups for college students or families storing limited numbers of documents and photos.
    Benefits: Price, ease-of-use, convenience, portability

    Drawbacks: Their small size makes them easy to lose. They are not encrypted so data can be at risk of theft. Relatively small storage capacity makes them suitable for home users but not businesses.

    Data Back Up Method 3: CD-ROMs or DVD-ROMs
    Many people still use CDs or DVDs to back up their data. These disks would be best used for monthly or annual photo backups, since they are easy to store and convenient to view files on any computer.
    Benefits: Portable, so you can store backups remotely, inexpensive, convenient
    Drawbacks: Data is not encrypted, so it’s not secure. CDs and DVDs are prone to scratching, which can corrupt files and render your back-ups unreadable. It could take many DVDs to back up an entire hard disk drive.

    Data Back Up Method 4: Tape Storage
    Many enterprise level businesses rely on tape for mission critical data storage, particularly when it comes to monthly or annual backups. Tapes can be stored conveniently off-site for access in the event a national disaster damages mission critical servers.

    Benefits: Tape storage permits storing large amount of data affordably. Tapes can last as long as 30 years or more and are not susceptible to shock damage. Easy off-site storage. 

    Drawbacks: High upfront costs. It may be slower to access recovery files off tape than off hard disk drives.

    Data Back Up Method 5: Cloud Storage
    More and more business and personal computer users are turning to cloud-based storage for their back-up needs. Cloud-based backups come in a number of forms, from storing all your data on Google Drive at the end of the night, uploading to Dropbox, or using a photo service such as FlickR for backup. At a higher level, business and personal users may consider using a dedicated cloud backup service to protect their mission critical files. Either of these solutions offers many advantages.
    Benefits: Access to your mission critical files from anywhere you have Internet access. Remote storage protects your files in the event of a natural disaster. Free or extremely inexpensive storage.
    Drawbacks: Data stored online may or may not be encrypted and secure. Operating System files may not be saved if you opt for a service like Google Drive or FlickR. Cloud-based backup services have monthly fees.

    Choosing a Back Up Process
    As you can see, users have a lot of choices when it comes to data backups, and the right data backups will vary depending on the frequency of backups required, amount of data to be backed up, and how important that data is, as well as the importance of keeping the data secure.

    From tape-based data backup systems to easy cloud-based systems or even USB flash drives, businesses and individuals will opt for different data backup solutions. Since data backups are such an important part of avoiding a data recovery emergency, we will explore this topic in more depth in future posts.

    For now, we’d like to remind you that it doesn’t matter so much which data backup method you choose, but that you choose one and then make regular backups at whatever frequency you determine is best. Even if your backup process involves plugging in a USB drive and saving your latest photos or the day’s documents, that may be enough for a home user.

    Businesses should make data back-ups and a data recovery action plan part of their business continuity plan. Regular backups won’t prevent every data recovery emergency, but they will help. For the rest, there’s 24 Hour Data

  • Posted on: 1/28/2014

    Database Recovery

     

    At 24 Hour Data, we know that small businesses and large organizations, alike, use databases for nearly every aspect of operations, from customer relationship management to sales and marketing and more. So when your database fails, you risk losing mission critical data that can cost your company important business… or even cost your entire business.

    If you are facing missing or corrupt data in your database or you can’t access your database at all, there are typically three common causes. Let’s look at each one and then determine the best steps to take to recover your lost data.

    Database Hardware Failure
    A database is just a combination of software and data. Frequently, when a database fails to boot, it’s due to hardware failure. The RAID array, server or hard drive has failed, resulting in the inability to access the database. If your database is stored on a RAID array and only one drive in the array has failed, it may be possible for IT professionals to perform a hot swap and replace the failed drive in a RAID 1 configuration or higher.  But keep in mind that if your data is not backed up and corruption occurs during the rebuild, then your data may be unrecoverable, even for data recovery professionals such as 24 Hour Data.

    If your database is stored on a virtual server, you may be able to restore the server to the time of the last snapshot, but be sure not to restore to the device that you are attempting to recover data from.  If only a small amount of time has passed and your database is not updated frequently, you may be able to recover your lost data.

    In many cases, however, hard drive or RAID failure requires a professional data recovery service to restore lost data without the risk of losing that data forever. If you’re in doubt, call data recovery pros to provide a free price quote with no obligation.

    File Corruption
    Databases may fail at the file level, which means one or more files in the database have become damaged, causing corruption. Corrupted files represent logical damage to the database and hard drive. However, do-it-yourself data recovery may overwrite the data and result in permanent data loss. If you don’t have experience in dealing with data recovery, it’s best to call an expert. Prices for logical data recovery may be lower than you expect, and you could get your data back in less than 24 hours.

    File System Damage
    Sometimes, operating system files will become damaged or corrupted if a server or computer is powered down incorrectly, experiences a power surge, or something happens to interrupt the process while data is being written to the files.

    Since databases are complex systems that are updated frequently, if a damaged OS file corrupts a database directory, it can be difficult to delete and reinstall the OS without permanently losing data from the database.

    Call the Experts for Database Recovery
    If you’re not an expert in data recovery, it’s best to call experts for help.
    24 Hour Data has years of experience recovering databases running on a variety of systems, including Microsoft Exchange, SQL, MySQL, Oracle, SharePoint, Filemaker and more.  For more information regarding data base recovery, visit the Database Recovery page on our website.

     

  • Posted on: 1/21/2014

    Cloud Backup

     

    With so many choices available for data backups today, there’s no excuse not to backup mission critical files. Or is there? Maybe you’re just overwhelmed with the backup choices and don’t knowto start.

    First, remember – any backup is better than no backup. Two backups are better than one. And three, with one stored in a remote location, is optimal for a business with mission critical data.

    Today’s storage options include tape-based backup systems, NAS devices, SAN devices, and RDX cartridges, which combine the benefits of RAID storage and hard disk storage with the mobility of tape-based storage. And, of course, more and more businesses are turning to cloud-based data storage. Is this really the best choice?

    Benefits of Cloud-based Storage
    Thousands of tech bloggers have explored the benefits of cloud-based storage for data backups.

    - Inexpensive (or even free)

    - Remote access so even if you can’t reach your office, (or your office has been destroyed or flooded) you can retrieve mission critical files and resume business to a degree

    - Secure, with SSL-encyrption protecting your files

    Disadvantages of Cloud-based Data Backups
    As prevalent as it has become, cloud-based data storage does have a few drawbacks.

    - If your internet goes down, which it may during a natural disaster, you won’t be able to access your back-up files. However, with so many different means to connect to the Internet today, this is less of a concern.

    - Bandwidth – Similarly, uploading terrabytes of data to a cloud storage provider can be slow and costly and can max out data transfer resources.

    - Putting your trust in an outside service provider – Entrusting an outside firm with your mission critical files, and counting on the fact that you’ll be able to access those files when you need them, requires a large leap of faith for business owners. That’s why it’s important to choose your cloud data storage provider carefully.

    Opting for cloud storage as one of your backup methods is a cost-effective, safe, smart choice. And it’s even smarter to count on 24 Hour Data when your back-up methods fail, as they sometimes will. 

  • Posted on: 1/08/2014

    Backup Recovery

     

    Frequent, effective backups are an important part of a business continuity plan and necessary to avoid a data recovery emergency in your business. But should you opt for tape back-ups, hardback-ups, or even newer technology? 


    Let’s look at some of the pros and cons of each for a small-to-mid-size Dallas business.

    Pros of Tape Storage
    Even as hard disk storage gets cheaper and larger, tape storage is not dead. Let’s look at some of the benefits.

    Virus Protection
    A reduced risk of virus corruption is one benefit. Viruses that may get onto a server will transfer to the hard disk drive, and then be spread through the entire system. A virus that accidentally gets backed up to disk will stay on that disk and corrupt only that file. 

    Ease of Transport
    Tapes are small, durable and extremely easy to ship or drive to an off-site location for back-up data protection against local disasters, including fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and the like. Moving a RAID server used for back-up is more difficult, with a greater risk of shock damage. Data transfer may occur over WAN, but this is costly and time-consuming to set up.

    Lower Cost
    From moving to maintenance to storage of tape based backup systems, tape is cheaper. However, this advantage can also be a disadvantage, because tape-based storage can be lost or stolen in transit, leading to great security risks for businesses backing up customer information, trade secrets and other mission critical data. 

    Pros of Hard Disk Based Storage

    Security
    Let’s look at one of the benefits of hard disk based storage as compared to tape. Today’s encrypted hard drives permit an added level of security for hard disk based storage in RAID configurations.

    Speed
    One of the biggest breakthroughs with hard disk based backup is the speed of both backup times and recovery times if data needs to be accessed from the back-ups. With better compression of files and data de-duplication at the destination, less resources are used for the recovery process.

    Reliability
    Because of the number of moving parts in a tape-based back-up system, as well as the possibility for read/write errors on the tape itself, tape back-up may be affordable but it may not provide the peace-of-mind you need for your organization.

    Should Businesses Ever Back Up Data to Tape?
    After reading this, you may wonder if tape is ever a wise choice. Because of its portability and affordability, tape-based backup still excels for long-term backups stored off site.


    Do your hourly or daily backups locally on a RAID server back-up system, and then on a monthly or quarterly basis, back up your files to tape, stored off-site. In a worst-case data recovery emergency, you’ll have something.

    Of course, since back-ups are not 100 reliable, and there is often a significant time gap between the last back-up and server failure, 24 Hour Data should be part of every Dallas company’s business continuity plan. 

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